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HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS (HIV)

and ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME (AIDS)

CDC FACTS

The abstract information on this page taken directly from CDC data.

Research has revealed a great deal of valuable medical, scientific, and public health information about the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).  The ways in which HIV can be transmitted have been clearly identified.

How HIV is Transmitted

HIV is spread by sexual contact with an infected person, by sharing needles and/or syringes with someone who is infected, or, less commonly, through transfusions of infected blood or blood clotting factors.  Babies born to HIV-infected women may become infected before or furing birth or through breast-feeding after birth....

In the health care setting, workers have been infected with HIV after being stuck with needles containing HIV-infected blood or, less frequently, after infected blood gets into a worker's open cut or a mucous membrane (for example, the eyes or inside of the nose)...

Kissing

Casual contact through closed-mouth or "social" kissing is not a risk for transmission of HIV.  Because of the potential for contact with blood during "French" or open-mouth kissing, CDC recommends against engaging in this activity with a person known to be infected.  However, the risk of acquiring HIV during open-mouth kissing is believed to be very low....

Saliva, Tears, and Sweat

HIV has been found in saliva and tears in very low quantities from some AIDS patients....

Effectiveness of Condoms

Condoms are classified as medical devices and are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).  Condom manufacturers in the United States test each latex condom for defects, including holes, before it is packaged.  The proper and consistent use of laxex or polyurethane condoms when engaging in sexual intercourse -- Vaginal, anal, or oral -- can greatly reduce a person' risk of acquiring or transmitting sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV infection.

There are many different types and brands of condoms available -- however, only latex or polyurethane condoms provide a highly effective mechanical barrier to HIV. ...

For condoms to provide maximum protection, they must be used consistently (every time) and correctly.

 

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